The Best Materials for Your Kitchen Countertops

 

Your countertops are the work surfaces of your kitchen. Selecting the correct  material for your countertops is, therefore, a significant detail of your kitchen  remodel. When deciding on a kitchen countertop material, you need to reflect on the kitchen design that you have in mind and your way of living. Give thought to what the uses are for your countertop – is it used as a chopping  board, trivet, and or/rolling surface for baking? Then it needs to possess  characteristics like robustness and resistance to heat to meet these needs. With the following description of the most favorable materials, you’re bound to discover the best option for your kitchen countertops.  

 

 

 

Granite Countertops 

Granite countertops are popular with homeowners and house hunters alike. It is  well-liked due to its ability to inject some opulence and grandeur into even the  humblest of kitchens. Luckily for kitchen renovators, the price of granite has significantly lowered over the years, as a result of enhanced supply due to the  prevalence of engineered stone in recent years. This has made granite more accessible to the average homeowner. Granite is a great material for kitchen  countertops because it is tough and resilient, heat resistant, increases property value, and comes in a variety of different types and colors.  

The cons of using granite as a kitchen countertop material are, however, that it is very costly, dull knives, cracks with excessive weight, needs a sealant to prevent staining, self-installation is not possible, and slabs can possess defects.  

 

Marble Countertops  

Extracted straight from the soil of mother earth, marble is what is known as a natural stone. Each and every sheet of marble is visibly distinct – this is what  makes such an exclusive and interesting material for kitchen countertops. Worth its weight in gold, the steep price of marble means that its use is often restricted  to a kitchen island or peninsula.  

Highly esteemed in the art world for its use in architecture, sculpture, and design; marble is recommended for kitchen countertops for the following  reasons: water and heat resistance, striking one-of-a-kind veining, and a home  value increase. On the contrary, marble is also highly permeable and tends to stain and scratch easily and restoration is costly. Marble countertops are, therefore, only an option for homeowners who can afford its hefty price, in addition to  regular maintenance in the form of sealing and polishing.  

 

Quartz Countertops  

Quartz is not to be confused with quartzite, which is its natural form. Quartz is an engineered stone that is made up of a combination of up to 94% loose quartz and 6% pigments and resins. This forms the quartz slabs which are used for kitchen countertops. Quartz differs from marble and granite in the fact that it is man-made and, therefore, possesses none of the shortcomings of natural stones. It, therefore, has no structural flaws, does not require routine maintenance, is  nonporous so does not stain and scratch easily, and is customizable. Quartz countertops can also be self-installed and are acid and heat-resistant. The only drawbacks to quartz are its high weight and cost.  

 

Laminate Countertops  

A laminate countertop is essentially composed of a particle board center and  sheets of laminate bonded together. Laminate has a smooth finish, which makes it an easy surface to wipe clean. It has traditionally been perceived as being inferior to more expensive countertop options but has become fashionable in the past few years because of the extensive selection of shapes, patterns, and colors obtainable. You can also install laminate countertops yourself and they are well suited for retro-style kitchens. On the downside, laminate counters possess  visible seams, chip and scratch easily, and can be adversely viewed as cheap looking.  

 

Wood Countertops  

Wooden countertops are very popular in farmhouse or rustic kitchen designs.  They are obtainable, at a great expense, in a large variety of types and stains of  wood. Kitchen designers often suggest wooden countertops to give a kitchen a warm and inviting ambiance. Wood is also a natural material that has a minimal  environmental impact, an earthly charm, and can last a lifetime with regular  maintenance. However, routinely sanding and sealing wooden countertops can become a major inconvenience. There is an additional risk of bacteria formation if the wood is not sealed properly and it is further prone to water damage, dents, and scratches.  

 

 

While kitchen countertops are highly decorative and practical, they are in need  of base cabinets onto which they can be attached to live up to their full potential. Nelson Cabinetry offers a FREE consultation on our white shaker kitchen cabinets that go with just about every countertop material available. Give us a ring at 832-998-6598 and we’ll let you know just how the best countertop materials and the best cabinets go together.