Kitchen Trends through History

 

 

 

Kitchen trends have evolved and changed only to go back in time to pick up certain twists that can become a part of a modern-day kitchen design. Back in the day, our kitchens were nothing like they are today, though it’s possible to see how old features have adapted to our contemporary lifestyles.

 

 

The kitchen is the centerpiece of any home and it’s impossible to even imagine a living space without it. When we dream of our ideal kitchen, often it’s of an open space plan with plenty of natural light. It’s a place where we can do more than just cooking, which stands in contrast with what we know about how kitchens started back in the day. 

 

 

Thinking of evolution in kitchen design can be a nostalgic walk down memory lane for some, an entertaining perspective for young generations, and quite inspiring to all of us. So let’s take a look at trends from decades past to see what the foundations of the modern kitchen are.

 

 

 

 

Kitchens Before the1950s

 

 

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Years when kitchens were humble spaces in the back of the house, reserved for just the cook are long gone. That tiny room was nothing more than random work tables and chairs serving as countertops. Kitchen organization hardly existed and every part of the kitchen consisted of free-standing elements. More often than not, you would have found toasters, waffle irons, and other small appliances on the dining table.

 

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In the 1930s, metal cabinets were all the rage. The shiny and clean stainless steel kitchens from that time feel a lot like a restaurant kitchen today. We can only assume that the 1930s were the years of inspiration for this industry. During this era, saving space was a major concern. Often you’d find ironing boards hidden behind a wall panel, which today sounds like a great idea, though maybe somewhere other than the kitchen.

 

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Soon after, in the 1940s, the glamorous lines of the Art Deco period made their way into the kitchen with more rounded edges. This style took a plain stainless steel kitchen to another level. It can serve as a great example of how design works – we often pick up inspiration from the past and adjust it to fit the present. Art Deco is something we use in design even now, through with different variations on the original themes.

 

 

 

 

Kitchens After the 1950s

 

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In this era, colors and patterns are bold, creating a distinct interior landscape for the kitchen. We know these kinds of kitchens well from TV shows and movies of that era. It was a time of innovation in appliances, too, and the electric range became the hallmark of the high-tech kitchen. Living spaces grew larger, and so did the kitchens. An open space plan connected with the living room started becoming a trend. Refrigerator sales went up the roof so everyday grocery shopping trips became a matter of the past. Our kitchens changed with us and they grew with our needs and habits.

 

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In the 1960s, kitchen design exploded with colors and innovations. You could find lots of lime green and orange colors alongside indoor barbecue appliances. Our food prep took a turn and became less complicated and time-consuming. New hobby chefs were born and with that, a kitchen became more social than ever before. This decade marks a transitional period from the classy but colorful 1950s to the wild 1970s. 

 

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You can love or hate the 70s but historically, this period was very experimental in almost all aspects of life, especially style. The Kitchen was no exception. You could combine the saturated colors of the wallpaper with wood cabinets, avocado-colored appliances and get away with it. Linoleum is a modern-day horror but the 70s were wild and groovy. Some features from these 70s kitchens are retro elements in the kitchens of today.

 

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Every party eventually ends and so did the 70s. Kitchens from the ’80s were brighter, lighter, and whiter. White cabinets became a major design trend along with progressive kitchen layouts. Appliances started to come in just black and white and black too, complementing an overall kitchen look. Countertops became a great spot to do homework, watch some TV, or even set up a provisional office. In the ’80s, the island took center stage. Part of this was due to the natural evolution of the kitchen as a social space and the development of the island as a pure status symbol.

 

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Tiled countertops were a thing in the ‘80s but in the ’90s, high-end homes were all about granite countertops. The color was more subdued with sage and hunter-greens walking that fine line between soothing and statement. While light oak finishes and all-white appliances were a trend, marble also became widely sought-after.

 

 

 

 

A Modern Kitchen 

 

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What makes a difference in today’s kitchen is a variety of choices in comparison to past decades. Back in the day, particular styles grew and changed together, transitioning to something new. And now, a kitchen design is everything but basic. In a fact, it’s so versatile that it can incorporate elements from the past and present while looking towards the
future, too.

 

True freedom is when you can combine pop-up elements or blend everything and still have an amazing and functional kitchen. From Shaker-style cabinets to raised panel cabinets, your kitchen can be a reflection of your personality. We’ve seen that wasn’t the case in the past. People had what they could get and there was not much variety.

 

 

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Modern living certainly has its perks. For example, you can have a free 3D kitchen design to see

how Shaker-style cabinets are going to look in your kitchen. We think that’s pretty amazing!