How to Choose the Best Kitchen Cabinet Materials for Your  Kitchen  

 

 

Your choice of cabinets is one of the most essential components of your  kitchen’s design. With the right cabinets, you can achieve the look and  workflow of your culinary dreams. Like any hard-working object, kitchen  cabinets are likely to depreciate over time. However, your choice of kitchen  cabinet materials can minimize the corrosive effects of their continuous use. If  you want to keep your cabinets in good condition, you should familiarize  yourself with the following pros and cons of different types of materials.  

 

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Hardwood vs MDF 

The cabinet doors are the first thing that you see when you look at a cabinet. It  should, therefore, not only be functional but also aesthetically pleasing. The unique stains of hardwood make your cabinets interesting to look at. Using sold  wood as the material for cabinet doors also has additional advantages, such as  being robust and long-lasting with the help of regular upkeep. Contrarily, the  drawbacks of using solid wood as a kitchen cabinet material are that it reacts to  temperature changes by swelling or shrinking.  

Medium-density fiberboard is manufactured from sawdust and resin binding  agent is just the opposite and can better resist the adverse effects of hot and  humid temperatures. MDF also favorably possesses an even surface area to  paint on, is more affordable than solid wood, and its thickness is consistent, so it does not form splinters when cut. MDF material does, however, have its  weaknesses. Its high density makes it challenging to lift or move. As a highly  porous material that lacks wood grain, it is not susceptible to staining. MDF  additionally does not provide a secure footing for screws, as it consists of very  small fragments. Lastly, MDF can emit toxic fumes called volatile organic  compounds (VOCs).  

 

 

Plywood vs Particle Board 

The type of material used for the inner structure of a kitchen cabinet is just as  significant as its outward appearance. Currently, plywood and particle board are  the two most popular materials used for the construction of the interior cabinet  box. Plywood is a beneficial material to use in the sense that it is sturdy,  relatively water-resistant, and weighs less than particle board. However, it is a  costly material to purchase.

Genetically engineered from a combination of wood chips and synthetic resin,  particle board on the other hand is moderately priced, broadly available, and  secure when its veneer remains fixed in position. The cons of using particle  board as the material for a kitchen cabinet box, however, include its propensity  to gradually bend out of shape, susceptibility to water damage, and heaviness.  

 

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Self-Close vs Soft-Close Drawers  

In regard to drawers, they can either be classified as self-close or soft-close.  Self-close drawers move in a backward motion along the slide, and then shut  with a loud and sharp noise; whereas soft-close drawers close slowly and  gently. Self-close hinges are advantageous when used on kitchen cabinet  drawers because they are inexpensive and built to last. However, if you have a  young and curious brood, they are more likely to get their little fingers jammed  when having a peep inside the snack drawer. The shutting motion can also  produce a sound that is quite jarring.  

Soft-close drawers comparatively close in a swift, effortless, and inaudible  motion. Their hinges are also long-lasting and child-friendly, as there is no risk  of doors shutting close with a bang. The only real downside to soft close hinges  is that they are slightly more expensive than their self-closing counterparts but  so worth it! 

 

As a purveyor of kitchen cabinets only made from the best materials, Nelson Cabinetry knows YOUR worth. Get hold of Nelson Cabinetry today on 832-998-6598 for a free consultation on our soft-close and all-wood constructed  cabinets – i.e., the crème de la crème of kitchen cabinetry materials.